How a fraud conviction on your criminal record can impact your life

fraud conviction impacting life

If you were convicted of fraud recently or even years ago, it can have a lasting effect on your life. The immediate consequences may include a fine or time behind bars. Once the sentence is completed, it can be easy to forget about this conviction. However, you can be sure that it will appear on your criminal record if a criminal record check is conducted.

Criminal record versus vulnerable sector check

There is a difference between a criminal record check and a vulnerable sector check. A criminal record check will reveal any criminal charges, discharges, convictions, and fingerprints. A vulnerable sector check can be used when you apply for a position of authority or trust when working with young or vulnerable persons. These checks reveal your criminal record along with any pardons Canada (record suspensions) for sexual offences or other relevant police records.

fraud conviction and applying for a jobFraud convictions and employment ramifications

If you are looking for a new job, you can expect the employer to do some investigating. They will check your references and they may do a criminal record check too. Depending on the province in which you live, you can legally be denied employment based on your current or past offences.

In certain provinces, you may only be denied a position if your offence relates to the job you are applying for. In other words, if you have a fraud charge against your name, you may find it very difficult to be hired in any job that involves accounts or finances. Remember, a fraud charge can also affect your prospects as a volunteer. It will depend on the organization, their policies and the position you wish to fill.

Fraud charges and your travel plans

Canada has a lot to offer in terms of sights and attractions. However, international travel has even more to offer. The United States is the top international location for Canadians. When crossing the border, your documents will be checked by the United States authorities. Since they have access to several databases, they can also check your Canadian criminal record before allowing you to cross.

If you have been charged or convicted of a charge like fraud, you can very easily be denied entry. If you are turned away based on your criminal record, it will make any future trips that much more difficult.

Fraud convictions and filing for custody

Whether or not you were married to your partner, a split is always more complicated when children are involved. Whether you are filing for joint custody or full custody, you can be sure that any and all skeletons will be revealed. Any charge or conviction can make your former partner appear to be the fit parent while they use your record against you.

It’s also important to remember that you can lose a custody battle if you live with somebody who has a criminal record. When a judge reviews your case, you will need to provide your criminal record and anyone you live with will need to do the same. Failing to do so will have the same effect as if you have a criminal conviction.

Pardons Canada  for fraud convictions

Fraud comes in various forms and, in many cases, you might not get the opportunity to explain the circumstances surrounding your conviction. Which is why it is so important to take the necessary action before this charge can do any more damage.

If you have been convicted of fraud, you will need to file for a Canadian pardon. If you have been charged but not convicted, then file destruction is needed. In both cases, you will need to provide several relevant documents and certain criteria need to be met. In the case of a conviction, you will need to complete your sentence before waiting for an allocated period of time. Hereafter, you should be eligible to submit a pardon request.

If you’ve had a run in with Canadian law enforcement and you want to enjoy the freedom of a clean record once again, contact Record Free at +1 (866) 928-3260. We will help you determine your eligibility for a pardons Canada.

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